yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read

To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.

These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my consciousness that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.

While there are loads of other great books on writing, I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”the topics of these books are very diverse!

  1. Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it! (Addendum 9/22/14: I saw her speak at the BKBF yesterday and she is SO COOL.)
  2. On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long timelike, 6 months or a yearand come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!
  3. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!
  4. The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!
  5. Elements of Style by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a giftfor high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all aboutgasp!grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-yI really want this illustrated copy!

If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritingbooks and I’ll reblog you! 

medievalpoc:

gaymergirls:

aww nasa has a page for space technology terms you can use in science fiction

nerds

Math and Science Week! (for my fellow ‘nerds’)


So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPSHow to generate a map in Photoshop (video)How to create (mountain) brushes (video)How to create trees (video)How to create mountains and hills (video)How to create swamps and deserts (video) Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2) Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4) 
CITIESCity Map GeneratorClevergirlhelps’ Brilliant Post on City PlanningThewritingcafe’s Brilliant Post on City PlanningStreets VS MonumentsHow to create a grid in PhotoshopCity BrushesCities to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)MISC.Ship PlansHow Geography Affects ClimateHow Streets Evolve as Cities GrowHistory of Building MaterialsClimatesR. Steves’ Europe (Videos) NEED A NAME? Location and Setting name generatorPirate Ship name generatorShip name generator

So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPS
How to generate a map in Photoshop (video)
How to create (mountain) brushes 
(video)
How to create trees 
(video)
How to create mountains and hills 
(video)
How to create swamps and deserts 
(video)
Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2)
Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)
Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources
World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)

(Source: elizaabennet)

victoriousvocabulary:

How It’s Said (substitutes)

In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.

In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.

In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.

In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.

In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.

In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.

In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.

In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.

In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.

In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.

In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.

As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.

[Source] [[Jack Teagle]

harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.
harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.

harmonyinkpress:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

This is beautiful.

sarcoptid:

regalium:

IDK IF YOU KNOW ABOUT THIS WEBSITE YET, BUT I DON’T EVEN CARE IF YOU DO.

CHARAHUB BASICALLY ALLOWS YOU TO MAKE A DIRECTORY OF ALL YOUR OCS.

LIKE SO

image

AND SO (they let you get super detailed)

image

It lets you store 100 characters (you gain 2 extra slots…

writingwithcolor:

image

Writing with Color: Description Guide - Words for Skin Tone

We discussed the issue of describing People of Color by means of food in Part I of this guide, which brought rise to even more questions, mostly along the lines of “So, if food’s not an option, what can I use?” Well, I was just getting to that!

This final portion focuses on describing skin tone, with photo and passage examples provided throughout. I hope to cover everything from the use of straight-forward description to the more creatively-inclined, keeping in mind the questions we’ve received on this topic.

So let’s get to it.

S T A N D A R D  D E S C R I P T I O N

B a s i c  C o l o r s

image

Pictured above: Black, Brown, Beige, White, Pink.

"She had brown skin.”

  • This is a perfectly fine description that, while not providing the most detail, works well and will never become cliché.
  • Describing characters’ skin as simply brown or beige works on its own, though it’s not particularly telling just from the range in brown alone.

C o m p l e x  C o l o r s

These are more rarely used words that actually “mean” their color. Some of these have multiple meanings, so you’ll want to look into those to determine what other associations a word might have.

Read More

bleedforyourtypewriter:

Ok here is a compilation of all the software and useful tools I’ve come across whilst writing. Some of them I’ve reviewed on here already, more coming soon. 

Got an idea? Well get planning! Here’s some useful outlining, brainstorming and mind- mapping software:

Just want to get writing? You want a word processor:

Making notes? Here you go:

Timelines giving you a headache? Try these:

Now perhaps you want to organise those notes. Got a lot of research? Character sheets? Images? Well here’s some tools to keep all that together:

Are you easily distracted? The following tools will keep you on track:

Even more productivity tools to help keep you focussed on your task:

So you’ve got something down? Need to edit? 

All done? Perhaps you’d like some e-publishing tools:

I’m feeling generous, have some more cool stuff:

Enjoy! I may update the list as I find more, or I’ll make a second list.

elumish:

  1. Leftover inconveniences (braces, casts, etc.)
  2. Renewable energy
  3. Creative attempts at fuel
  4. Cooperation
  5. Warlords
  6. Increased infant mortality
  7. Change in hierarchy (laborers more important than white-collar workers, etc.)
  8. New governmental structures
  9. Mercenary groups
  10. Formation of new states
  11. Formation of non-state groups
  12. Regrowth of land
  13. Lack of food security
  14. Reduction in gun usage (as ammunition runs out)
  15. Decrease in age of pregnancy and/or marriage (as life expectancy decreases)
  16. Direct effects of the apocalyptic event
  17. Increased multi-generational homes (as building houses becomes difficult again)
  18. Increased multi-family homes
  19. Attempts at sophisticated surgery with rudimentary tools
  20. Reduction in birth control
  21. General reduction in technology that requires sophisticated manufacturing
  22. Simple food
  23. Handmade clothing
  24. Clothing from animal products
  25. Houses built for natural lighting
  26. Attempted—and failed—swift adjustments to lack of technology
  27. Changes in views of morality
  28. Different types of law enforcement
  29. Changes in religion
  30. Attempted attachment to old societies
  31. Deliberate breakaways from old societies
  32. Attempts to cling on to old ideas of beauty despite changes in available beauty products
  33. Reduction in hygiene
  34. Increase in water-borne illnesses and parasites
  35. Lack of clean water
  36. Reduction in luxury goods
  37. Increase in homelessness
  38. Lack of communication capabilities
  39. Return to radio
  40. Lack of light pollution
  41. Attempted school systems
  42. Return to apprenticeship-style teaching
  43. Return to agricultural-style living
  44. Dealing with environmental fallout from apocalyptic event
  45. Dealing with environmental fallout from previous generations